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The Importance of Getting a Flu Shot in 2020-2021

The Importance of Getting a Flu Shot in 2020-2021

Getting a flu vaccine is more important than ever during 2020-2021 to protect yourself and those around you. People who are 65 years and older are at high risk of developing serious complications due to influenza (flu) and account for most hospitalizations and deaths. So this season, take extra precaution. Below is the importance of getting a flu shot during 2020-2021.

Flu vaccination is an important preventive tool for people with chronic health conditions.

Because the flu is caused by influenza viruses that infect the nose, throat, and sometimes the lungs, it can make long-term health problems worse, even if they are well managed. Diabetes, asthma, and chronic heart disease are among the most common long-term medical conditions. When you get vaccinated, you reduce your risk of being hospitalized or dying from influenza complications.

It is important to get a flu shot every year.

Every flu season is different, and influenza infection can affect people differently, but millions of people get Influenza every year. Flu viruses are constantly changing, so flu vaccines may be updated from one season to the next to protect against the viruses that research suggests will be common during the upcoming flu season.

The side effects of flu shots are mild when compared to potentially serious consequences of flu infection, especially during the current pandemic.

After getting your flu shot, the most common side effects include soreness, tenderness, redness and/or swelling where the shot was given. Flu vaccination has important benefits, such as reducing flu illnesses and doctors’ visits, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations and deaths.

We each have a responsibility to protect our most vulnerable. All 8 of our senior communities are providing employees and residents a safe and clean space to receive their flu shots.

To learn more about 2020-2021 flu season recommendations, visit https://www.cdc.gov/flu/.